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The Rest is Politics

Two men who’ve been at the heart of the political world - former Downing Street Director of Communications and Strategy Alastair Campbell and cabinet minister Rory Stewart - join forces from across the political divide. The Rest Is Politics lifts the lid on the secrets of Westminster, offering an insider’s view on politics at home and abroad, while bringing back the lost art of disagreeing agreeably.

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This was a particularly difficult @restispolitics episode to record as @rorystewartuk was struggling to get to a World Cup match. We got there in the end and covered Labour and the constitutional review, my memories of GW Bush, how S Africa President Ramaphosa is facing a bit of bother thanks to half a million bucks down the side of the sofa, and much much more. LINK IN BIO and also with some news re our Albert Hall event next week ...

A bit of half time hanging out with @caradillonsings and Sam Lakeman at their brilliant Union chapel gig. They’ve been married 20 years … @therealfionamillar and I used to babysit them and their brothers. We are getting old ...

Our annual trip to hear the lovely voice of @caradillonsings … time to give the football a bit of a break. ...

Tree of the Day the big Christmas Tree at Somerset House where we went skating with friends. Well in my case hung onto the rail and watched @therealfionamillar whizz round. Fair to say I will never be an ice hockey player ...

Two sports people who fascinate non sports people as well as sports people @theneweuropean has some great stuff on Eric Cantona. As for the Jeremy Wilson book on cyclist Beryl Burton not read it yet because my 97-year-old mother-in-law liked the look of it when she saw it on our kitchen table, took it home, and loved it!! She has no interest in 🚴‍♀️ whatsoever but loved the story. Sport transcends!! ...

I find it baffling that the papers continue to allow themselves to be exploited by No 10 with these PR puffery pictures taken by personal photographers funded at our expense. Sunak is following the Johnson Truss playbook. Wake up media Ffs. It is about exclusion rather than inclusion. The promised accountability it ain’t. ...

Tree of the Day Brazil who with France are one of the two teams capable of winning the World Cup methinks ...

Gracias @apple apple.co/ShowsWeLoved2022 ...

My Latest Book

Living Better – Paperback Cover

Living Better (Paperback)

How I Learned To Survive Depression

by

Alastair Campbell




"Superbly readable, supremely useful. This book could save lives."

Stephen Fry

LIVING BETTER is Alastair Campbell’s honest, moving and life affirming account of his lifelong struggle with depression. It is an autobiographical, psychological and psychiatric study, which explores his own childhood, family and other relationships, and examines the impact of his professional and political life on himself and those around him. But it also lays bare his relentless quest to understand depression not just through his own life but through different treatments. Every bit as direct and driven, clever and candid as he is, this is a book filled with pain, but also hope - he examines how his successes have been in part because of rather than despite his mental health problems - and love. His partner of forty years, Fiona Millar, writes a moving afterword on how she too has learned to live with his depression.

Depression is the predominant mental health problem worldwide - it is estimated that 1 in 6 people in the past week experienced a common mental health problem and major depression is thought to be the second leading cause of disability worldwide. LIVING BETTER is a call to arms and an extraordinary memoir in one compelling and inspiring narrative. This is a book that really could save lives.

Alastair Campbell says: ‘We all know someone with depression. There is barely a family untouched by it. We may be talking about it more than we did, back in the era of 'boys don't cry' - they did you know - and when a brave face or a stiff upper lip or a best foot forward was seen as the only way to go. But we still don't talk about it enough. There is still stigma, and shame, and taboo. There is still the feeling that admitting to being sad or anxious makes us weak. It took me years, decades even to get to this point, but I passionately believe that the reverse is true and that speaking honestly about our feelings and experiences (whether as a depressive or as the friend or relative of a depressive) is the first and best step on the road to recovery.’